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You, yes, you can still buy tickets to see Taylor Swift perform this year, but get ready to empty your wallet. The platinum-selling pop star released an initial wave of tickets for her upcoming Reputation tour last month and was greeted with...let’s call it a mutable response. The New York Post reported struggling ticket sales for Swift, observing that none of her 30+ tour dates sold out, compared to Swift’s last tour, 2015's 1989 Tour, which grossed just over $250 million worldwide.

The Post quoted an anonymous “music industry insider” as saying, “Sales so far have been a mega disappointment. There are hundreds if not thousands of tickets left for every show.” The tepid sales reported by the Post could be attributed to the increased price of the tickets, which were designed to keep them out of reseller hands. The result, now, is that initial ticket prices for fans are still super expensive, some upper bowl seats across the country going for hundreds of dollars.

Ticketmaster, however, doesn’t appear phased by the slower-than-usual sales: They told the Post that Taylor Swift’s own version of the verified fan program, Taylor Swift Tix, was “the biggest registration we’ve ever had.” They’ve also probably never used the program on an artist as big and culturally relevant as Taylor Swift before, but the statement is undeniably positive.

Jay-Z faced similar criticism about the struggling ticket sales with his 4:44 tour, because he also sold tickets at a market rate in an effort to curb reselling. The tickets might be ridiculously pricy, but at least for Taylor and Ticketmaster, they’re collecting all of that money on this tour.

As for the fans suffering from high prices: You might just have to find some solace in YouTube videos that’ll follow her performances. There doesn’t seem to be much of an alternative.