via Andreas Rentz/Getty Images

The 2018 Winter Olympics opening ceremony takes place Friday, February 9, in Pyeongchang, South Korea. Even if you don’t care for sporting events (I’m personally excited for curling), you should still watch the ritual: All of the participating countries will stream in to the Pyeongchang Olympic Stadium, and you’re guaranteed to get chills and/or a little emotional—which is really what the Olympics are all about. There will be great music, too: Ha Hyun Woo, the lead singer of an indie rock band from South Korea called Guckkasten, will perform, along with Ahn Ji-young from the K-pop duo Bolbbalgan4, Korean R&B legend Insooni, and others. (If you haven’t already, familiarize yourself with all the great Korean musical acts playing the ceremony by checking out our guide, here.)

Here’s how to tune in Friday, February 9: NBC will air the ceremony once, without commentary, at 6 a.m. EDT (as it happens live in Pyeongchang). The network will broadcast it again, with commentary from Katie Couric and Mike Tirico, again at 8 p.m. EDT for everyone who didn’t want to wake up that damn early to see it the first time. You can easily catch either if you have cable (and a TV) on your local NBC channel. You could also stream the opening ceremony live (so, again, at 6 a.m. EDT on Friday) on a smart TV with the NBC Sports app, or on NBCOlympics.com, or stream it on demand after the primetime presentation ends.

If you don’t have a cable subscription (or a cable subscription login from someone who likes you enough to let you use their account), you’ll only be able to watch the first 30 minutes of the opening ceremony via the NBC Sports app or on NBCOlympics.com before you’re asked to login through your cable provider to keep watching. As our buds at Gizmodo write, your best option, in that case, is to get a Hulu Live subscription. The first two weeks are free, which means if you subscribe on Friday, you should be covered for the full duration of the Olympic games.

Happy watching!