via Marcus Ingram/Getty Images for Bacardi

Update (11.16, 9:30 a.m.): On Wednesday, November 15, Meek Mill filed a motion to be released from prison and to terminate his probation, according to Billboard. Citing court documents, Billboard also reported that on Tuesday, Meek’s team also officially requested Judge Brinkley to be recused from considering the appeal and “from any further adjudicatory role in this case.”

See the original story below.

Earlier this week, Meek Mill was sentenced to two to four years in prison by Common Pleas Court Judge Genece E. Brinkley. Brinkley cited a number of probation violations during the trial, including a pair of arrests in which charges were dropped, as Mill “thumb[ing] his nose at the court.”

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But the story took a rather insane turn in the days after his trial, when Meek’s team alleged that Brinkley has engaged in unscrupulous behavior of her own. One of the rapper’s attorneys, Joe Tacopina, told Billboard that the judge attempted to leverage the Mill trial for personal gain. Apparently, Brinkley asked the rapper to remake a Boyz II Men song and mention her name on the track. Tacopina also claims that she asked Meek to leave Roc Nation and sign with her friend’s management company.

In a new interview with the Fader, Tacopina said that his team would ask for Brinkley to recuse herself from the appeals process. He claims that she’s willfully extended the case for five years longer than it was supposed to (via the Fader):

“Based on her conduct over the years, we knew there was an issue,” Tacopina said. “His probation was supposed to end in 2013, and here it is, nearly 2018, and he’s still on probation for technical violations, travel violations — just doing work, which nobody gets violated for. It’s allowed her to extend her control over him for another five years.

Tacopina also claims that Nicki Minaj, who was dating Mill at the time, was a witness to Brinkley’s request that he remake Boyz II Men’s “On Bended Knee.” However, Tacopina doesn’t expect Minaj to be called as a witness in his appeal case. “We have no need to call any witness at this time and that is not always required in appeals but we will do whatever we need to do to make sure this perversion of justice is corrected,” Tacopina told the Fader.